JOB MOBILITY AND EARNINGS OVER THE LIFE CYCLE: The Earnings of Older Men A. The Sample

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The National Longitudinal Survey was started in the year 1966 for men aged 45-59 during the original survey. This data provides us with a longitudinal (though retrospective) working life history of older men. Because of the structure of the questionnaire, It Is possible to get, at most, the duration of three Jobs In the individual’s working life: the first full-time Job ever held after completion of schooling, the longest Job isver, and the current Job.

Since two or three of these Jobs might refer to the name Job (that Is, the first Job was also the longest Job, etc.) we have different numbers of Jobs across individuals. The data also allows us to determine the time elapsed between Jobs— e.g., time elapsed between the first and longest Job,, or a “residual.” action payday loan

The earnings functions derived earlier require Che same number of Jobs across Individuals. To do this, the sample was broken up Into four Job mobility patterns:

Pattern 1—only one job has been held since the completion of schooling. Obviously, this pattern Is composed of the most non-mobile Individuals.

Pattern 2—the first job after the completion of schooling Is different from the current job, which Is also the longest job ever. We can also Identify the time elapsed between the first and current jobs, or a residual. This pattern, therefore, Is characterized by three segments.

Pattern 3—the first job was the longest job ever, and Is different from the current job. Again we can Identify a residual: the time elapsed between the first and current jobs. This pattern, too, Is characterized by three segments.

Pattern 4—the first, longest, and current jobs are all different. Two residuals can be estimated for these Individuals: the time elapsed between the first and longest Jobs, and the time elapsed between the longest and current jobs. This mobility pattern clearly contains the most mobile Individuals and Is characterized by five segments.